european psychiatric association

Eating Disorders

Section committee

MONTELEONE Palmiero , Chair

TREASURE Janet, Co-Chair

MILOS Gabriella, Secretary


Aims & Objectives

Section mission

Eating disorders are one of the most common health problems in adolescents and young adults of Western countries. They are more common in females and include anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, binge-eating disorder and other unspecified or otherwise specified eating disorders. Although they are primarily psychiatric disorders, they may have serious and severe consequences on the physical health of affected people, representing one of the most frequent causes of disability for young people, carrying also a significant risk for death. The WHO identified eating disorders as a priority for the mental health of adolescents and young adults. The EPA section “Eating Disorders” is aimed to promote high standards in research, training and clinical practice in the field of so severe and disabling psychiatric disorders.

Section objectives

  1. To enhance the attention of both mental and non-mental health specialists (practitioners) toward eating disorders
  2. To disseminate updated knowledge relevant to etiopathogenesis, prevention, diagnosis and treatment of eating disorders
  3. To advance the development of evidence-based therapeutic interventions
  4. To develop proposals for adoption as EPA consensus and position statements in the field of eating disorders
  5. To encourage research on the identification of at risk subjects
  6. To establish working relations with national and international organizations sharing the goals of the EPA in the field of the Section
  7. To address ethical issues in research and clinical care involving people with schizophrenia
  8. To identify unmet needs and means to address them
  9. To develop and deliver training courses for undergraduate, postgraduate and continuing professional development
  10. To compare clinical service, training, research and policy across Europe
  11. To share information of different practices and legislation in different parts of Europe
  12. To fight stigma and discrimination of people with eating disorders

Activities

Meetings/events

Childhood trauma and Eating Disorders: neurobiological and clinical aspects

Childhood trauma and Eating Disorders: neurobiological and clinical aspects
Description :

Exposure to trauma during childhood is believed to be a major risk factor for lifelong psychiatric disorders, including schizophrenia, depression, post-traumatic stress disorder and eating disorders (EDs). The mechanisms through which early life trauma can have such persistent detrimental effects are still poor understood. It has been hypothesized that childhood maltreatment acts as a stressor inducing a cascade of neurohumoral reactions, especially involving the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, leading to alterations in brain-development that may have psychopathologic consequences in genetically vulnerable individuals.

This symposium  illustrated the research evidence supporting a theoretical pathogenetic link between early trauma experiences and ED psychopathology in order to suggest new perspectives for prevention and/or treatment of anorexia nervosa (AN) and bulimia nervosa (BN). To this purpose, the functioning of the endogenous HPA axis activity in subjects exposed to early traumatic experiences, the effects of childhood trauma on the neurobiology of adults patients with EDs, the impact of childhood maltreatment on ED psychopathology and its implications for clinical treatment have been presented. In particular, V. Mondelli (London, UK) discussed the endogenous biological mechanisms likely involved in mediating the role of early life trauma as a risk factor for development of adult psychopathology. Dr. A. Monteleone (Naples, Italy,) presented the neurobiological effects of childhood trauma exposure in adults patients with AN or BN. Dr. S. Guillaume (Montpellier, France)  discussed the associations between adverse childhood experiences and clinical characteristics of ED patients. 

Venue :
EPA CONGRESS NICE
Date :
March 4, 2018
Attendance :
80

Presentations at non-section events

How Can We Improve Adherence to Treatment in Eating Disorders

How Can We Improve Adherence to Treatment in Eating Disorders
Journal :
EPA Congress NICE, March 2018Workshop: How can we improve adherence to treatment in psychiatric disorders?
Journal :
Monteleone P
Acknowledged as official Section presentation ? Yes

Calendar of Future Activities

ED Section Symposium at the EPA Congress Warsaw, April 7, 2019: "Social Evaluation and Emotion Regulation in Eating Disorders: advances in the management of Anorexia and Bulimia Nervosa"

ED Section Symposium at the EPA Congress Warsaw, April 7, 2019: "Social Evaluation and Emotion Regulation in Eating Disorders: advances in the management of Anorexia and Bulimia Nervosa"
Desciption :

ED Section Symposium at the EPA Congress Warsaw, April 7, 2019: "Social Evaluation and Emotion Regulation in Eating Disorders: advances in the management of Anorexia and Bulimia Nervosa"

Besides the aberrant eating behaviours that severely impact on the physical health of individuals with anorexia nervosa (AN) and bulimia nervosa (BN), evidence is accumulating reporting alterations also in the domain of many cognitive functions related to socio-emotional processes. Although evidence is still sparse, new developments in precision psychiatry that may be of relevance to these disorders may stem from that area.

The aim of this symposium is to illustrate the research evidence supporting a theoretical pathogenetic link between alterations in the processing of socio-emotional cues and eating disorder (ED) psychopathology in order to suggest new perspectives for prevention and/or treatment of AN and BN. To this purpose, Prof. F. Fernandez-Aranda (Barcelona, Spain) will discuss the emotion regulation deficits of AN and BN patients, their biological background and their implications for treatment outcomes. Dr. A.M. Monteleone (Naples, Italy,) will present the functioning of the endogenous hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis in response to a psychosocial evaluation stressor in patients with ED, and its putative role in the patients’ ability to cope with social threatening stimuli. The role of newly identified neuropeptides (nesfatin-1, phoenixin, spexin, neuropeptide W, irisin, and adropin) as unique regulators of food intake and energy homeostasis will be discussed by Dr. Artur Pałasz. Finally, Prof. Katarzyna Kucharska will discuss treatment targeting social deficits and neurocognitive problems throughout hospital admission in anorexia nervosa using cognitive social cognitive and neurocognitive trainings.